Take Action Tuesday

Take Action Tuesday

Today’s Take Action Tuesday post is brought to you by Jenna Jablonski, member of the DC Pod of 500 Women Scientists and founder of Sister.

How does your STEM identity connect with your political identity?

For National Voter Registration Day in September, Sister is partnering with Science Rising to publish a series of articles showing how individuals in STEM can be political — and that our STEM work can even shape our advocacy work.

We want to share your perspective. How does your STEM identity connect with your political identity (your advocacy work, issues you care about, etc.)? How does this tie in with your personal identity and/or journey in STEM?

If you’re interested in writing, send a pitch by this Friday (8/16) to hello@sisterstem.org. Pitches can be short descriptions of what you plan to write about, or a sample/excerpt from the proposed article. Full articles (about 700-1,000 words) will be due at the end of August. Sister happily provides editorial support along the way.

You can also spread the word by retweeting this tweet or sending anyone who may be interested to sisterstem.org/write.

Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash

Juneteenth

Juneteenth

Juneteenth commemorates the announcement of the abolition of slavery in Texas on June 19, 1865. The Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1863, technically freeing enslaved people in the Confederate states, but enslaved people in Texas weren’t aware of their freedom until the official announcement arrived in Galveston, TX. This is why Juneteenth is so significant. Civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer once noted that “nobody’s free until everybody’s free.” There were still enslaved people who had not yet received this news of freedom - which means that slavery was not over.

Take Action Tuesday

Take Action Tuesday

Tomorrow is the one-year anniversary of the public release of the National Academies’ report, “Sexual Harassment of Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine.” Removing sexual harassment and discrimination from our scientific culture is going to require persistent and coordinated efforts for meaningful change to actually happen. Supporting system-wide policies like the aforementioned legislation, and working to support survivors and improve institutions on a local level are critical to spurring change.

Take Action Tuesday

Take Action Tuesday

Last week the Court of Arbitration for Sport decided to prevent Caster Semenya (NYT) and other women from competing in world sport competitions because of their innate high testosterone levels may constitute an unfair advantage. This is not only unfair (lets face it, no one prevented Michael Phelps from competing) but also an opportunity to educate ourselves that narrow definitions of womanhood are misogynistic, racist, transphobic and are NOT based in science. We must:

Take Action Tuesday

Take Action Tuesday

April 11-17th is Black Maternal Health Week, organized by the Black Mamas Matter Alliance to bring awareness and action to maternal health and reproductive justice . The month of April is also recognized in the United States as National Minority Health Month – a month-long initiative to advance health equity across the country on behalf of all racial and ethnic minorities.

Take Action Tuesday

Take Action Tuesday

Many scientists have been very vocal about the importance of vaccination, however this may result in social media wars, in which both parties disagree, become increasingly angry, and no movement is made. Our goal is to improve the way we, as scientists, communicate with people who are hesitant about vaccines. Today, you can Take Action by using the literature to your advantage!

Take Action Tuesday

Take Action Tuesday

Mothers working in science have a tough job – juggling the demands of a career and looking after family. A recent study published in Nature found that in the United States “more than 40% of women with full-time jobs in science leave the sector or go part time after having their first child”. This week in #TakeActionTuesday the focus is all about supporting mothers in science. How can you help those around you?